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Gray Remnant Interviews Destiny Gene

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GrayRemnant avatar GrayRemnant
Level 62 : High Grandmaster Senpai
3,249
Back when I was making Year in Review, I was going to include bonus interviews with some of my favorite PMC members.  Sadly, due to the word limit (don't worry, it's astronomical; you'll probably never have to deal with it), I was unable to fit them into the blog.  Still, it would be a waste to just discard them, so here's the first of those interviews.

Today, I'm interviewing Destiny Gene.  He specializes in a variety of subjects here on PMC.  Here's some interesting facts about him.

Fun Facts!
-Destiny Gene has competed in 12 PMC-officiated contests.  He was a finalist in 8 of them, and won first place in the Penthouse Sweet contest last year.

-Destiny Gene has posted in various sections here on PMC, including 33 projects, 11 skins, and 20 blogs.

-Destiny Gene has obtained a medal in every middle-tier category on Week in Review, something only 4 people have ever done.

-Destiny Gene finished in 6th place for the year of 2015 on Week in Review.



Gray: Hello Destiny Gene.  Glad to talk to you today.

Destiny Gene: Hello, Gray.  It has been a long journey of Minecraft through PMC, and I am honoured to have this (my first) interview with you.

Gray: You’re all over the place.  You’ve made acclaimed content including structures, terraforming, organic work, skins, and even blogs.  You’ve won medals in every single category here on Week in Review, you’ve gotten dozens of awards in PMC contests (including a 1st place trophy in the Penthouse Sweet competition), and you do most of it all by yourself.  So, I guess my first question is this: How the hell are you doing all this?!?

Destiny Gene: The many talents such as projects, skins and stories that people think I master in Minecraft is just the application of my high school pressure/studies and inspiration combined.  I rather humbly call myself a polyvalent pluralist: someone who tries to accept everything and do everything.  In my opinion, I believe this attitude is crucial in securing one's future career where if a field of work I desire cannot accept current recruits, I look forward to different fields because they are all equally interesting to me, but of course I'm never perfect in any of them.  Any tutorials or inspirations about or outside Minecraft should continuously incite new and existing talents.

Gray: So, seeing as how you’ve done virtually everything there is to do in Minecraft, I take it you’ve built quite a repertoire of experience in structures, terraforming, and organic work.  Which category do you find the most enjoyable?  Which do you believe suits your skill-set the most and why?

Destiny Gene: The category of WiR I mostly enjoying creating is the landscaping/terraforming.  It was only recently that I've discovered the wonders of World Machine and its potential use in Minecraft terrain.  The ideas for this seems so vast that it can suit any situation scene in high detail, and there seems to be no limit to making entire fantasy worlds.

However, I'm mostly suited to constructing buildings through fantasy, modern/cultural architecture etc.  It's easier for me to visualise what kind of building I want to make, what its inhabitants are and what they need such as resources and living space.  Vast worlds and simple, sometimes unnecessary organics cannot have as much practicalities as the structures.

Gray: You began your PMC career two and a half years ago with a humble adventure map, for which you received a total of 6 diamonds, 1 favorite, and 56 downloads.  Since then, you’ve made 64 submissions, accrued thousands of diamonds and favorites, and gotten over 10,000 downloads.  How have you developed as a content creator over the years?  What lessons and secrets have you learned, and what mistakes have you made?

Destiny Gene: Over the years of PMC, I alternated between studies, Minecraft and other games.  With studies I exercised my critical, pragmatic attitude towards a project while other games, entertainment and music fueled my imagination, and an actual Minecraft project I have built in my free time.

There were many milestones to the course so I'll just mention a few.  I have learnt to harness creative mods such as WorldEdit and VoxelSniper with shaders to flavour the presentation.  I have read tips on several external programs such as MCEdit, Mine-imator and MCSkin 3D.

A LOT of mistakes have been made in my experience such as rushing a project and missing details, cramming in too much of the detail and others which some conveniently are offenses in my profile.

Gray: For most of the other people I interviewed, I asked questions about some of their best builds.  But you’re different.  You have a sort of strange consistency with your work.  Everything you make is exceptional, but not much of it stands out compared to the rest.  So, since I am unable to decide what I liked best from you, I’ll ask you this: What is the best thing you’ve ever built in Minecraft and why?  Is there any one build that defines you, or is your work just too diverse to define with a single build?

Destiny Gene: The best thing I believe to have ever been built was Levia One (not the turtle, I apologise due to its maximal popularity) because I challenged all of the categories of WiR - structures, organics and terraforming (the water terrain).  Someone went as far to plagiarise and enter it in some random competition, yet I actually became flattered by all the comments praising the build (and promptly hating the thief).  So far that is what defines the many talents I have, or not yet have discovered.

Gray: Let’s talk about your Penthouse Sweet entry.  I’m not going to ask you why you won, because you and I already know the answer to that question.  You won because you transformed the living crap out of the space you were provided.  While other people worked with the boundaries, you took it a step further: you bent the boundaries (not physically, mind you, but in a more abstract sense).  You utilized every square inch of space and divided it up into a veritable labyrinth of floors, rooms, and staircases.  And in the end, it became impossible to even notice the boundaries, because you created an environment so dense with detail and so completely unique, that nothing could have possibly beaten it.

So, with all that said describe what it was like building this.  How much sleep did you lose, and what inspired you?

Destiny Gene: Building the Hasu (pun) was fun; I researched a wide range of techniques to maximise detail from the basis of redstone to 1.8 features like armor stand items and banners.  Honestly, I didn't lose any of my desired sleep for there was plenty of time before the submission deadline, and I have experience of building tiny homes.  Originally I toyed with the idea of "building rooms inside rooms" and tried to manifest some modern ideas revolving around this, but the issue I expected was originality.  I instead integrated this into Japanese architecture which I admire very much (thanks, Studio Ghibli!).

Gray: You had one of your builds featured on Rooster Teeth.  So, since I’m running out of ideas for questions, I’ll just steal this one from Geoff.  Why?  Why do you do all this?  What drives you?

Destiny Gene: To answer Geoff's second question, no I don't have a thing for turtles.  I make projects off Minecraft because of two things.  Firstly, I was an enthusiast of Lego and continuously recorded most if not all my creations, so I could be viewed as a natural builder.  Secondly, I want to base my hobbies on productive aspects like Minecraft that allows me to expand on social status, skills in computer programs and links to other talents which I would want to discover.  One of the foundations I base my Minecraft life is the "epic" music I listen to.  Let's just say Thomas Bergersen and Globus drove me to the hall of fame.

Gray: Since you’re into skins, I guess we can talk a little bit about that (even though it really doesn’t have anything to do with WiR).  How do you come up with fresh ideas when it comes to skins?  How do you go about pushing the envelope with such a limited canvas to work with?  Describe your process and the kinds of color patterns you like to work with.

Destiny Gene: When it comes to skins, I immediately avoid the first ideas coming to my mind like the flourishing teen skins.  From there I can build up original and eccentric characters by mashing up some ideas, like an underground K9 unit.  However, I don't lay out a whole plan for the character's appearance before the actual skinning, due to the pixel boundaries.  I simply start with colour schemes like blue, dark blue and yellow and paste what the character wears, what they are equipped with for what role or job they do.  Using MCSkin 3D's burning and darkening tool, that is when the long "shading" part of the skin takes place depending on texture of the surface I shade.  Occasionally I would add an atmospheric light to it to indicate location or aura, as done in Al Rassoul and Colonel Mael Radec.

Gray: And for the final question, is there anything you’re working on right now that you’d be willing to divulge here?  What do you have in store for us in the immediate future?

Destiny Gene: I am slightly prepared for another large scale project which is as much effort as Rollerquester, but, like I said before, I would want to base it on a jukebox "epic" music to compliment the grandeur.  So far I am not sure about delivering that in the near future for I would want to save it for a building contest, or when I have plenty of time... that seems to diminish each year.

Gray: Alrighty then, thanks very much for answering my questions in such great detail.  I appreciate it.  ;)

Destiny Gene: Thanks, Gray.  To you and to the audience reading this interview, I'll conclude with a suitable note.  Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!



Again, keep in mind that this interview took place early in January.  Time sure does fly fast.  xD

Thank you very much for reading!  I hope you enjoyed today's interview, and don't forget to check out Destiny Gene here on PMC. See you guys next time!

-Gray Remnant
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1
02/19/2016 1:22 pm
Level 65 : High Grandmaster Fox
Jordanw5432
Jordanw5432 avatar
I am quite surprised about this...

in the good way, of course XD
1
02/19/2016 5:54 pm
Level 62 : High Grandmaster Senpai
GrayRemnant
GrayRemnant avatar
As long as it's the good way.  xD
1
02/15/2016 11:35 pm
Level 18 : Journeyman Explorer
RenegadeRad
RenegadeRad avatar
brilliant. I was waiting for this.
1
02/16/2016 1:41 pm
Level 62 : High Grandmaster Senpai
GrayRemnant
GrayRemnant avatar
Thanks, bud! Wait. How . . . how did you know I was doing this? o.O
1
02/16/2016 8:31 pm
Level 18 : Journeyman Explorer
RenegadeRad
RenegadeRad avatar
We 3 are friends, someday you had to interview that guy lol.
1
02/17/2016 5:38 am
Level 62 : High Grandmaster Senpai
GrayRemnant
GrayRemnant avatar
Lol, I suppose so.  xD
1
02/15/2016 8:35 am
Level 9 : Apprentice Network
WhoIsThis
WhoIsThis avatar
That's what you call an interview. Atleast it's not like those of the PMC multitude. Good job Gray!
Me next, Gray!
1
02/16/2016 1:41 pm
Level 62 : High Grandmaster Senpai
GrayRemnant
GrayRemnant avatar
Haha, thanks. I've got a few more to get to and then I'll get to you. ;)
1
02/14/2016 1:09 pm
Level 38 : Artisan Dolphin
Masq
Masq avatar
Was really good to see a quality interview with indulgent, and involved questions/responses that stray from the monotonous style of the majority. Nice job :)
1
02/14/2016 9:40 pm
Level 62 : High Grandmaster Senpai
GrayRemnant
GrayRemnant avatar
Thanks, my friend!  Glad you think so.
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